Divine Office | The two lives

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from a homily by St. Augustine of Hippo (354-430 A.D.). He wrote an enormous amount and left a permanent mark on both philosophy and theology. His Confessions, as dazzling in style as they are deep in content, are a landmark of world literature. The Second Readings in the Office of Readings contain extracts from many of his sermons and commentaries and also from the Confessions. For a reflection, "The two lives," please click on the image. Peace be with you!

Divine Office | No one has ever ascended into heaven except the one who descended from heaven

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from a sermon by St. Augustine of Hippo (354-430 A.D.). He wrote an enormous amount and left a permanent mark on both philosophy and theology. His Confessions, as dazzling in style as they are deep in content, are a landmark of world literature. The Second Readings in the Office of Readings contain extracts from many of his sermons and commentaries and also from the Confessions. For a reflection, "No one has ever ascended into heaven except the one who descended from heaven," please click on the image. Peace be with you!

Divine Office | What binds us together is Christ

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from a commentary on the gospel of John by Saint Cyril of Alexandria, bishop (370-444 A.D.). Cyril entered a monastery, became a priest and in 412 succeeded his uncle as Bishop of Alexandria. Alexandria was the largest city in the ancient world. Rather like Los Angeles, it was a sprawling mixture of races and creeds; and it was a byword for the violence of its sectarian politics, whether of Greeks against Jews or of orthodox Christians against heretics. He fought strongly against the teachings of Nestorius and took the lead at the Council of Ephesus, plunging into the turbulent politics of the time and defending the Catholic faith through to its ultimate victory. Cyril wrote many works to explain and defend the Catholic faith. For a reflection, "What binds us together is Christ," please click on the image. Peace be with you!

Divine Office | The Holy Spirit renews us in baptism

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from the treatise "On the Trinity" by Didymus of Alexandria (ca. 310-395 A.D.). Didymus was a leading opponent of Arianism, which held that Christ is not truly divine but a created being. His Trinitarian and Christological doctrine is perfectly orthodox. He was a pioneer in expressing the doctrine of the Trinity in a way that was clear and unambiguous and could not be misunderstood. This was a delicate business requiring a careful choice of terms, especially in Greek, which lacked a direct equivalent of straightforward Latin words such as persona. “On the Trinity”, which is used in the Office of Readings, is his most important work. For a reflection, "The Holy Spirit renews us in baptism," please click on the image. Peace be with you!