Divine Office | The martyrs had seen what they proclaimed

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from a sermon by St. Augustine of Hippo (354-430 A.D.). He wrote an enormous amount and left a permanent mark on both philosophy and theology. His Confessions, as dazzling in style as they are deep in content, are a landmark of world literature. The Second Readings in the Office of Readings contain extracts from many of his sermons and commentaries and also from the Confessions. For a reflection, "The martyrs had seen what they proclaimed," please click on the image. Peace be with you!

Divine Office | Life in man is the glory of God; the life of man is the vision of God

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from the treatise "Against the Heresies" by St. Irenaeus (ca. 130 - 202 A.D.) Whenever we take up a Bible we touch Irenaeus’s work, for he played a decisive role in fixing the canon of the New Testament. It is easy for people nowadays to think of Scripture – and the New Testament in particular – as the basis of the Church, but harder to remember that it was the Church itself that had to agree, early on, about what was scriptural and what was not. For a reflection "Life in man is the glory of God; the life of man is the vision of God," please click on the image. Peace be with you!

Divine Office | God can be found in man’s heart

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from a homily on the Beatitudes by St Gregory of Nyssa, bishop (335-395 A.D.).

Gregory of Nyssa was the younger brother of St Basil of Caesarea (“St Basil the Great”). He, Basil and Gregory Nazianzen, “Gregory of Nazianzus”, are known as the Cappadocian Fathers. They were active after the Council of Nicaea, working to formulate Trinitarian doctrine precisely and, in particular, to pin down the meaning and role of the least humanly comprehensible member of the Trinity, the Holy Spirit.

For a reflection, "God can be found in man's heart," please click on the image.

Peace be with you!

Divine Office | Christ should be manifest in our whole life

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from a treatise on Christian Perfection by St Gregory of Nyssa, bishop (335-395 A.D.).

Gregory of Nyssa was the younger brother of St Basil of Caesarea (“St Basil the Great”). He, Basil and Gregory Nazianzen, “Gregory of Nazianzus”, are known as the Cappadocian Fathers. They were active after the Council of Nicaea, working to formulate Trinitarian doctrine precisely and, in particular, to pin down the meaning and role of the least humanly comprehensible member of the Trinity, the Holy Spirit.

For a reflection, "Christ should be manifest in our whole life," please click on the image.

Peace be with you!