Divine Office | The Lamb that was slain has delivered us from death and given us life

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from a homily by St. Melito of Sardis (d. 180 A.D.). He was the bishop of Sardis near Smyrna in western Anatolia, and a great authority in early Christianity. His work, "On the Passover," sets the Last Supper and the Passion in the context of the Jewish Passover and thus relates Christianity to its roots in Judaism. For a reflection on "the lamb that was slain" please click on the image. Peace be with you!

Divine Office | The perfection of love

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from a treatise on John by St. Augustine of Hippo (354-430 A.D.). He wrote an enormous amount and left a permanent mark on both philosophy and theology. His Confessions, as dazzling in style as they are deep in content, are a landmark of world literature. The Second Readings in the Office of Readings contain extracts from many of his sermons and commentaries and also from the Confessions. For a reflection on "the perfection of love" please click on the image. Peace be with you!

Divine Office | Let us too glory in the cross of the Lord

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from St. Augustine of Hippo. He wrote an enormous amount and left a permanent mark on both philosophy and theology. His Confessions, as dazzling in style as they are deep in content, are a landmark of world literature. The Second Readings in the Office of Readings contain extracts from many of his sermons and commentaries and also from the Confessions. For a reflection on the glory in the cross of the Lord, please click on the image. Peace be with you!

Divine Office | Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord; blessed is the King of Israel.

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from the discourse "On the Palm Branches" by St. Andrew of Crete. Andrew was a noted preacher of sermons and discourses, and it is extracts from these that form some of our Second Readings. As might be expected from such a poet they are clear and inspiring (credit: Universalis, http://www.universalis.com). For a reflection on this Palm Sunday please click on the image. Peace be with you!