Divine Office | I have fought the good fight

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from a homily by St John Chrysostom (349-407 A.D.). John was born in Antioch. After a thorough education, he took up the ascetic life. He was ordained to the priesthood, and became a fruitful and effective preacher. He was elected Patriarch of Constantinople in 397, and was energetic in reforming the ways of the clergy and the laity alike. He incurred the displeasure of the Emperor and was twice forced into exile. When the second exile, to Armenia, had lasted three years, it was decided that he should be sent still further away, but he died on the journey, worn out by his hardships. His sermons and writings did much to explain the Catholic faith and to encourage the living of the Christian life: his eloquence earned him the surname “Chrystostom” (the Greek for “golden mouth”). For a reflection, "I have fought the good fight," please click on the image. Peace be with you!

Divine Office | For Love of Christ, Paul Bore Every Burden

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from a homily by St John Chrysostom (349-407 A.D.). John was born in Antioch. After a thorough education, he took up the ascetic life. He was ordained to the priesthood, and became a fruitful and effective preacher. He was elected Patriarch of Constantinople in 397, and was energetic in reforming the ways of the clergy and the laity alike. He incurred the displeasure of the Emperor and was twice forced into exile. When the second exile, to Armenia, had lasted three years, it was decided that he should be sent still further away, but he died on the journey, worn out by his hardships. His sermons and writings did much to explain the Catholic faith and to encourage the living of the Christian life: his eloquence earned him the surname “Chrystostom” (the Greek for “golden mouth”). For a reflection, "For Love of Christ, Paul Bore Every Burden," please click on the image. Peace be with you!

Divine Office | We have found the Messiah

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a sermon of St John Chrysostom, bishop (349-407 A.D.), on St John's gospel. He was elected Patriarch of Constantinople in 397. His sermons and writings did much to explain the Catholic faith and to encourage the living of the Christian life, and his eloquence earned him the surname “Chrysostom” (the Greek for “golden mouth”). For a reflection, "We have found the Messiah," please click on the image. Peace be with you!

Christian Music | Hymn of the Cherubim: Tchaikovsky

"If I were to describe sunlight to a blind person this is what I'd make them listen to," was the description of the young Kushala Daora on YouTube. Another said in response to her comment, "This is what I imagine a sunrise sounds like." Music stirs the soul. It enlivens man because in music we can encounter the good, the true, and the beautiful. Man is ordered to such things because, as the Catholic Church teaches, in such things we encounter God's wonder. Today, we encounter a beautiful rendition of "Hymn of the Cherubim" by Tchaikovsky performed by the USSR Ministry of Culture Chamber Choir. It's a beautiful piece of music for sure from the man who also composed "The Nutcracker," "Swan Lake," and the "1812 Overture". What's more, when you listen to it, you can get lost in it and forget that it's only human voices you hear. The human experience is made richer when man encounters his Creator. There is a longing inside every human heart that the world cannot satisfy. It's when we ask, "Why is there something rather than nothing?" Or when we contemplate things like our own existence in the Universe that we begin on the road - on our journey - to the One who created the heavens and the earth; and who created you: a unique composition of body and soul. As C. S. Lewis famously said, “I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.” To listen to this beautiful work of human art, "Hymn of the Cherubim," please click on the image. Hope you enjoy. Peace be with you!

Divine Office | The weakness of God is stronger than men

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from a homily on the first letter to the Corinthians by St John Chrysostom, bishop (349-407 A.D.). He was elected Patriarch of Constantinople in 397. His sermons and writings did much to explain the Catholic faith and to encourage the living of the Christian life, and his eloquence earned him the surname “Chrysostom” (the Greek for “golden mouth”). For a reflection, "The weakness of God is stronger than men," please click on the image. Peace be with you!