Divine Office | Behold, your king is coming to you, the Holy One, the Savior

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from the discourse "On the Palm Branches" by Saint Andrew of Crete (ca. 650 - 740 A.D.). St Andrew of Crete is of great importance in the Orthodox Church because he invented – or at least introduced into the liturgy – the canon, a new form of hymnody of which there is no sign before his time. Canons are huge, elaborately structured musical and poetic compositions. Andrew’s immense “Greek Canon”, for instance, is a hymn 250 verses long interspersed with litanies and odes, takes three hours to chant, and goes chronologically through the entire Old and New Testaments, showing examples of the need for repentance and conversion. (credit: Universalis.com) For a reflection, "Behold, your king is coming to you, the Holy One, the Savior," please click on the image. Peace be with you!

Divine Office | The old has passed away: all things are made new

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from a discourse by Saint Andrew of Crete (ca. 650 - 740 A.D.). St Andrew of Crete is of great importance in the Orthodox Church because he invented – or at least introduced into the liturgy – the canon, a new form of hymnody of which there is no sign before his time. Canons are huge, elaborately structured musical and poetic compositions. Andrew’s immense “Greek Canon”, for instance, is a hymn 250 verses long interspersed with litanies and odes, takes three hours to chant, and goes chronologically through the entire Old and New Testaments, showing examples of the need for repentance and conversion. (credit: Universalis.com) For a reflection, "The old has passed away: all things are made new," please click on the image. Peace be with you!

Divine Office | Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord; blessed is the King of Israel.

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from the discourse "On the Palm Branches" by St. Andrew of Crete. Andrew was a noted preacher of sermons and discourses, and it is extracts from these that form some of our Second Readings. As might be expected from such a poet they are clear and inspiring (credit: Universalis, http://www.universalis.com). For a reflection on this Palm Sunday please click on the image. Peace be with you!