Divine Office | As the father sent me, so I am sending you

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from a commentary on the gospel of John by Saint Cyril of Alexandria, bishop (370-444 A.D.). Cyril entered a monastery, became a priest and in 412 succeeded his uncle as Bishop of Alexandria. Alexandria was the largest city in the ancient world. Rather like Los Angeles, it was a sprawling mixture of races and creeds; and it was a byword for the violence of its sectarian politics, whether of Greeks against Jews or of orthodox Christians against heretics. He fought strongly against the teachings of Nestorius and took the lead at the Council of Ephesus, plunging into the turbulent politics of the time and defending the Catholic faith through to its ultimate victory. Cyril wrote many works to explain and defend the Catholic faith. For a reflection, "As the father sent me, so I am sending you," please click on the image. Peace be with you!

Divine Office | The word of God is alive and active

In today's Office of Readings we encounter a reading from Bishop Baldwin of Canterbury: treatise 6 ( d. 1190 A.D.). Baldwin (d. 1190) was born in Exeter, but his date of birth is unknown. He was ordained priest and made archdeacon by Bartholomew, Bishop of Exeter. He subsequently became a Cistercian monk at the Abbey of Ford, in Devonshire, and within a year was made Abbot of Ford. In 1180 he was promoted to the Bishopric of Worcester and in the same year was elected to the primatial see of Canterbury by the bishops of the province. The election was disputed by the monks of Canterbury, necessitating the intervention of King Henry II. Even after his appointment was ratified he was engaged in disputes with the Canterbury monks, so that King Richard and the Holy See had to become involved. He is one of the last true representatives of the rich patristic-monastic tradition. For a reflection, "The word of God is alive and active," please click on the image. Peace be with you!